UTS GALLERY PROGRAM 2018

UTS Gallery is excited to announce our 2018 exhibition program which showcases the work of a diverse group of artists, curators and designers. These four exciting exhibitions and their associated programs examine the historical, social, and technological forces that shape our world. We look forward to sharing these exhibitions with you alongside new critical writingeducation activities for students of all ages, and public programs and events.

UTS Gallery will re-open in 2018 with Kate Scardifield’s solo exhibition Soft Topologies on February 27, 2018. Encompassing adaptable textiles, sculpture and video, Soft Topologies is a solo exhibition that considers the points of convergence between mapping the body and the practice of charting atmospheric space.

In May, Baden Pailthorpe’s Clangera solo exhibition, will investigate the aesthetics and spatiality of sport through data, bodies and technology. Resulting from ANAT’s 2017 Synapse artist residency with UTS Sport and Exercise Science, Clanger pairs the statistical tracking of AFL player performance with the emotional intensities of the crowd.

In July, Aaron Seymour will curate Hello World: Code and Design. The exhibition examines the role of code in contemporary design, examining the ways designers are integrating computation into their practice. The exhibition gathers objects and technologies from across the design spectrum— from fashion and textiles, to moving image, graphics and architecture—in order to reveal the new social and economic forces that generate them. Processes such as 3D printing evidence the migration of the digital from the screen to the physical world, while networked technologies and the ‘internet of things’ disrupt common models of manufacture and ownership. Hello World explores code as both material and process in the experience and formation of our world.

In September, Void, curated by Emily McDaniel, will explore the multiple ways in which artists visually articulate the unknown as space, time and landscape. The work of the included artists does not simply define the void as presence and comparative absence, but rather utilises form to represent the formless. The void is a multifaceted concept that brings together contemporary Aboriginal artistic practice from across the country. The exhibition will feature existing works across drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, textiles and photography.

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Image: James Tylor, (Deleted scenes) From an untouched landscape #7 (detail), 2013, inkjet print on hahnemuhle paper with hole removed to a black velvet void, 500 × 500mm. Courtesy the artist and GAGPROJECTS.